Big Data Analytics – Enabling The Agile Workforce

In a fast-paced, constantly evolving digital era, time waits for no one. Agility, fast recovery from failure and adaptability to change continue to grow in importance for businesses who want to remain competitive. The capability to be this sort of business requires the right team and right technology.

Agile refers to a type of project management used often for software development. Tasks are divided into short phases of work and plans are frequently reassessed and adapted.

Here’s three ways an agile approach to Big Data Analytics can improve the success of an organisation.

 

#1 – DECISIONS & DELIVERY IN NEAR-REAL TIME

Data science allows us to make sense of the information we collect, and identify the valuable insights hidden in terabytes of structured and unstructured data. That being said, Big Data projects can be uncertain in nature if the right delivery methods are not used. This is where agile comes in.

“The principles and practices that are collected under the Agile umbrella all focus on validating assumptions as early as possible in the delivery lifecycle, significantly reducing the risk exposure as the project continues. By delivering the work in small increments, even with production-ready software, those assumptions are all validated early on. All code, design, architecture and requirements are validated every time a new increment is delivered. Even the plan is validated as teams get real and accurate data around the progress of the project.” – Gino Marck: Head of Agile Competency Center, EPAM Canada.

 

#2 – TEAM EFFICIENCY & COMMUNICATION

For a team to truly embrace agile, an interactive, adaptable and feedback-driven culture must be fostered in the organisation. The ability of a team to communicate progress and change direction when needed is crucial to the success of any Big Data project.

“For example, Ruben Perez, who runs a digital project management team at Scholastic Corporation, has his managers hold a daily scrum. When work is moving fast, you have to ensure that everyone is moving in the same direction, he says. “The scrum manager holds a 15-minute check-in every day to ensure that the tasks that have been slotted for a particular sprint are on track and that nothing is blocking forward progress. Anything that is standing in the way is assigned to someone to resolve—separately.” – The Economist.

 

#3 – IMPLEMENTING THE RIGHT TECHNOLOGY

“Shorter product cycles, compressed delivery times and pressures from a global economy require employees to thrive on change and be empowered to make decisions in near–real time. To power this sort of agility, companies must have the right technology—tools that allow for instant communication, collaboration and centralised platforms. And they’ve also got to establish and nurture an adaptive culture. Changing directions in a large organisation with long-established processes isn’t easy.” – The Economist.

Once the right culture is set in place, working with the right tools is what makes agile possible. An organisation must select the technology that will best cater to the transformation they’re after. Luckily, there’s no shortage of options. We’ve rounded up a few that you may find useful.

 

#1 – JIRA

With key features like issue tracking, bug tracking, kanban boards, workflows and the ability to customise the dashboard to meet the needs of your business, this software is the among the most popular project management tools available.

 

#2 – PLANBOX

Built as a four-level platform supporting Scrum Methodology, Planbox allows members across the business to collaborate, plan, and deliver projects, as well as enabling agile software development. Its features include release management, iterations, stories, backlog, prioritisation, scrum roles, sprints, estimated hours and story points.

 

#3 – ASANA

Asana is the ultimate progress tracker that helps you visualise your team’s work and follow up on individual tasks on a kanban board, calendar or list. It’s a flexible tool that adapts easily to an organisation’s scrum practices. With work efforts and communication in one place, team members can ensure that they have full clarity on sprint plans, milestones, launch dates and backlog.

 

For more resources, please see:

Powering The Agile Workplace

Big Data Analytics – What It Is And Why It Matters

How To Choose The Right Technology For Agile Transformation

 

Agile project management tools:

Asana

Planbox

Jira – Atlassian

 

To discuss this and other topics, please contact the team at Contexti – +61 2 8294 2161
| connect@contexti.com